Government contacts for Baysave

Please contact our government officials to say that it is WRONG for the State of New Jersey to sue Sandy victims like us solely because rebuilding, permitting and financial recovery at the bayshore is moving so slowly.

If you landed on this page because you offered to contact a government official on our behalf, THANK YOU! Most government officials are not aware of the actions on NJDEP here at Money Island New Jersey. Please let them know that it is wrong for the State of New Jersey to sue the individuals and businesses at Money Island New Jersey simply because they are unhappy with the pace of post-Sandy recovery.

The following eight New Jersey state officials control much of the future of Money Island and the bayshore recovery issues. They are directly responsible for the decision of the State to sue Baysave, its officers and affiliates. Our three federal official are also included only to the extent that they have offered statements of support but they are not empowered to take direct action to stop the state’s lawsuit against us.


Governor Phil Murphy

Twitter: @GovMurphy

Web form (although his office has never responded to any of my requests): https://www.nj.gov/governor/contact/all/

Phone: (609) 292-6000

Mail: Office of the Governor
PO Box 001
Trenton, NJ 08625

My message: “Please support me and other Sandy victims here at Money Island being sued by the NJ Attorney General simply because some officials in government are unhappy with the slow pace of post-Sandy financial recovery and permitting. We are working as hard as we can to rebuild our lives after losing our homes and businesses and receiving no help from government in the recovery process. It is WRONG for the state to be using the massive power of the AG against poor rural citizens suffering in a depressed post-Sandy community making it even more difficult to rebuild our lives. Pease put an end to the legal prosecution while we continue to work on our financial recovery and land use permitting issues”.


Lieutenant Governor Sheila Oliver

Twitter: @LtGovOliver

Same other contact information as the Governor

NJ Attorney General Gurbir Grewal

Twitter: @GurbirGrewalNJ

Phone: 609-984-5828

Email/Webform: https://www.nj.gov/lps/formmail.htm

Mail: Office of The Attorney General
RJ Hughes Justice Complex
25 Market Street, Box 080
Trenton, NJ 08625-0080


State Senator Jeff Van Drew

Twitter: @jeffvandrew

Phone: (609) 465-0700

Email: SenVanDrew@njleg.org

Mail: School House Office Park

211 S. Main St. Suite 104.

Cape May Court House, NJ 08210


NJ Assemblyman  Bob  Andrzejczak

Twitter: @BobAndrzejczak

Same mail address and phone as Van Drew


NJ Assemblyman Bruce Land

Same mail address and phone as Van Drew


NJDEP Commissioner Catherine McCabe

Twitter: @NJDEPMcCabe

Mail: 401 E. State St.
7th Floor, East Wing
P.O. Box 402
Trenton, NJ 08625-0402

Phone: (609) 292-2885
Fax: (609) 292-7695


New Jersey Senate Majority Leader Steve Sweeney

Twitter: @NJSenatePres


US Senator Cory Booker

Twitter: @CoryBooker

Mail: One Gateway Center
23rd Floor
Newark, NJ 07102

Phone: (202) 224-3224 or 973-639-8700

Fax: 973-639-8723

Email of helpful Aid: Zach_McCue@booker.senate.gov


US Senator Bob Menendez

Twitter: @SenatorMenendez

Mail: One Gateway Center, Suite 1100
Newark, New Jersey 07102

Phone: 973-645-3030
Fax: 973-645-0502

Tim Hillman Aid Direct: 973-645-6640


US Congressional Representative Frank LoBiondo

Twitter: @RepLoBiondo 

Mail: 5914 Main Street Suite 103
Mays Landing, NJ 08330-1746

Fax: 609-625-5071

Phone: (202) 225-6572 or 609- 625-5008

Email: lobiondo@mail.house.gov

 

 

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An open letter to Governor Murphy on Cumberland’s County’s ongoing struggles

(An electronic version of this message was submitted through the nj.gov web site on July 20, 2018).

 

July 18. 2018

Governor Phil Murphy

PO Box 001

Trenton, NJ 08625

Dear Governor Murphy:

According to the most recent census data for the year 2016, the median household income in Cumberland County, NJ declined to $49,537. That compares to over $76,000 average in New Jersey where the average household income is growing at a healthy 5.5% rate overall. Our local property values continue to fall year after year, and are now less than half of the state average.  A 2016 study by Rutgers showed that the poorest and most rural areas of New Jersey get the least support from state government. I didn’t need the study to know that; we are still waiting for telephone lines, internet cables, public sewer, waste management solutions, water, police, etc. Yes, we are hurting and the economic gap continues to widen.

Many of us have not yet recovered from the “disaster after the disaster” of Superstorm Sandy where not only did state government exclude our county from essential recovery assistance, but then came in with increased regulation, enforcement and prosecutions of citizens that made our existing struggles much worse.  The combination of incompetence and corruption that we saw join forces in post-Sandy governance devastated many of my neighbors. Many of my neighbors have given up and moved away.

Yet we continue to build toward a better future. This week I met with the president of a local federal savings bank on behalf of a small business client. I mentioned that our local government is concerned that there is no bank in our township and this is hurting our chances at economic recovery. His response was clear: there isn’t be a bank here because “there isn’t any money”.  It’s true. We don’t have much money. Yet our people are extraordinarily resourceful. We’ve been described as a “pull ourselves up by the bootstraps crowd” that can overcome any challenge except the ongoing oppressive force of government corruption and shortsightedness.

Yesterday I struggled to find the money for a small business state permit application fee. The permit application fee is greater than the annual gross revenue of the project requiring the permit! While the fee would be manageable in other parts of the state, it is an economic deal killer here in rural Cumberland County. During my 20+ years of working here I have come to conclude that our largest problems are excessive taxes and over-regulation. Our property tax rates – measured as a percentage of property value – are perhaps the highest in the country. The percentage of gross revenue our small businesses pay to government is astronomically high. Despite this, we struggle without basic government-supervised services like telephone lines, internet, trash disposal, or public water and sewer. We pay the same but get far less in return. On a daily basis, we suffer the effects of bad public policy and ongoing unreasonable government harassment.

As long as the state government continues to use a “one size fits all” approach and continues to treat us in Cumberland County the same as the rest of the state, we will be locked in this downward spiral. Continuing to use the same failed government tactics will not work! Our county is packed with innovative hard-working citizens who only need the chance to be allowed to crawl from beneath the weight of onerous state government burdens. We can and will rebuild our Cumberland County communities. We simply need to get state government to stop  holding us down.

I urge you to immediately empower your administration to fast-track an alternate resolution procedures to allow our citizens to address our struggles with state government in a fair way that considers both the goals of your administration and the reality that is Cumberland County today. Please immediately stop the prosecution of local businesses like our that are trying to cooperate with the state. Please recognize that the overwhelming majority of local government officials and business leaders here are not OK with the state’s current policies toward Cumberland County.

Sincerely,

Tony Novak, CPA, MBA, MT

Controller

Baysave Association

Money Island, New Jersey

Superstorm Sandy Update at 5 1/2 Years

The government-created “disaster after the disaster” continues to dominate our lives. Virtually all government cooperation is still lacking at this point five and a half years after Sandy.

We have recently crossed the five and a half year mark since superstorm Sandy devastated our community and much of the damage has not yet been repaired. Fraud, mismanagement and red tape within the government systems that administer post-Sandy rebuilding programs are mostly to blame. We have plans and funding ready now but lack government approval to proceed. Many of the local people who initiated the “No retreat – Save the bayshore communities” campaign have sold their properties and moved out over the past year. Those who remain are deeply entrenched in a battle with government to negotiate a plan for recovery and sustainability.

Some of the issues that specifically hamper Money Island, New Jersey recovery are:

  1. New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance declined to investigate sales practices of insurance companies that sold inappropriate and inadequate coverage.
  2. The National Flood Insurance Program admitted fraud and mismanagement in handling flood insurance claims but continued to deny payment on those claims anyway. Policyholders have been forced to settle for lesser amounts or give up die to high legal costs of pursuing their claim in court.
  3. Most recovery programs were denied to homeowners and businesses on the New Jersey bay shore region. We read that 98% of all post-Sandy Small Business Administration loan applications were denied.
  4. Almost all of the applications, pre-application meetings and project proposal applications for post-Sandy recovery work at Money Island have been denied.
  5. The Trump administration announced the removal of funds promised and approved by Congress for post-Sandy mitigation programs. Citizen activists like me believe that the Trump action is retaliatory against east coast states like New York and New Jersey that are suing Trump and his government in multiple actions. Both of our New Jersey Senators, Bob Menendez and Cory Booker, as well as our Congressman Frank LoBiondo and other states’ Senators, opposed the move and sent a letter to Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) asking for a one year extension for projects that are underway but not yet complete. The letter is part of a bipartisan effort of Congress to keep the projects funded because we have simply not had enough time to meet all the rebuilding requirements.
  6. On June 8, 2018 the Trump administration reversed course and announced that it will not pull back previously approved funds.
  7. On Monday June 11, 2018 when NJ activist Doug Quinn addressed FEMA administrator Brock Long about specific policy provisions at the National Flood Conference in Washington, DC on Monday to address the Congressman’s’ letter this week, NFIP administrator Brok Long said “I’m not going to answer that”, then shut down the meeting to questioning and walked off the stage. Quinn later wrote that the event “was a learning experience. We have no friends there”.
  8. On the same day, June 11, 2018, at the public meeting of Downe Township Committee mayor Bob Campbell said that FEMA officials admit that post-Sandy projects they intend to see completed are still incomplete here in our township. There was no discussion of a timetable for the federally funded projects.
  9. Last month the New Jersey Attorney General filed a lawsuit against Tony Novak and others for failure to make progress on post-Sandy recovery despite the track record of more than ten applications and pre-application proposals to do so.

Given the history of what we call “the disaster after the disaster” I am not optimistic about any immediate change in government’s role in our future recovery. We will continue to push for our recovery and long term sustainability at a grass roots level for years to come. We are able to rebuild under the various regional and local recovery plans but we need government permission and cooperation to do so. We also need funding for those aspects of the recovery projects that benefit the public interest rather than just private businesses and homeowners. Virtually all government cooperation is still lacking at this point five and a half years after Sandy.

I anticipate at least two more years will be required to settle existing litigation and appeals and then return to the process of rebuilding. The legal battles are a waste of time and money that only enrich the lawyers on both sides but we don’t think that it is likely that government will act responsibly or come to our aid anytime soon.

Thanks LoBiondo for environmental support

lobiondo-at-mi

Congressman Frank LoBiondo has been a strong supporter of the Delaware Bay region, our environment and our businesses. This photo was taken on his recent visit to Money Island in August 2016 where he spoke about the difficulty in promoting our environmental interests in Washington. His efforts are largely responsible for the EPA-funded restoration projects here.

This week NJ.com recognizes LoBiondo as one of only a few Republican leaders nationwide willing to stand up to the to repeal environmental restrictions on the coal industry.

Earlier in 2016 the Congressmen met with me and a group of other concerned residents still fighting to settle Sandy insurance claims years after FEMA fraud admissions.

I am grateful for Congressman LoBiondo’s efforts and feel blessed to have him represent us in Washington DC.

FEMA Sandy response: better late than never?

In yesterday’s mail I received a certified mail letter from FEMA, the Federal Management Emergency Administration, admitting that the agency found previously unconsidered documents related to my Sandy flood insurance claim made almost four years ago. The letter comes in response to my attorney’s request for information under the Freedom of Information Act made more than a year ago in August 2015.

FEMA had previously denied almost all of my flood insurance claim based on information that appeared to me to be either entirely fictitious or perhaps someone else’s property. The case information that I saw bore no resemblance to my property and the photographs and notes that I saw the claim examiners make on site in my presence in late 2012 and early 2013.

The letter dated September 30, 2016, received October 8, 2016, says: “This letter is to inform you that the National Flood Insurance Program has located additional documents regarding your NFIP claim file”. FEMA now admits they have 381 pages about my claim in their case file but will only release 347 pages.  FEMA is apparently refusing to release 34 pages apparently based on “Exemption 6 to the Freedom of Information Act on the basis that these pages would create an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. I presume this might include personnel issues within FEMA and their contractors involved in the screw-up but this is only my speculation. I don’t know enough about this topic to comment further.

My cabin (rear) and BaySave office (front) prior to Sandy.
My cabin (rear) and BaySave home office (front) prior to Sandy.

After all insurance and aid requests were denied, I began slowly repairing the cabin as time and money allow. The cabin was low priority because I made the aquaculture facility and infrastructure repairs my my primary focus. We had to rebuild basic support like the marina community’s water system and electric service. I have only repaired about 1/2 of the damaged items and the most expensive issues remain unresolved. The external walls look OK now, but the roof, underside and waste water system still need repair or replacement. Even it the claim were settled in full today, my legal expenses would consume at least half of that amount.