Unprecedented flash floods

Yesterday some middle Atlantic towns like Millville New Jersey (shown) and Ocean City, Maryland were hit with unprecedented flooding. These events are not a surprise to us. We’ve had at least three “hundred year floods” in the past decade. One of those floods cost me the nicest sports car I’ve ever owned. Money Island is now accustomed to bizarre flooding.

Millville flooding

A large number of Americans, perhaps even the majority, are unable or unwilling to associate these rare and unusual flooding events with global climate change. In my opinion, it takes a significant amount of study and understanding of climatology and public reaction to climate change deniers to reach the conclusion, as most scientists have, that the two issues are connected. They wonder how a freak sudden single weather event can be caused by changing climate conditions. This lack of information and specifically the high dollar amount of resources spent by climate deniers devoted to preventing Americans from understanding this science is a serious concern.

My own conclusion has been that until the “rich and famous” people start losing their shoreline homes and investments, we won’t give this issue the attention it needs.

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State of New Jersey vs. Tony Novak, et. al.

Baysave was named as a defendant along with its controller Tony Novak in a lawsuit filed May 4, 2018 by New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal. The lawsuit does not allege that Baysave or Novak or anyone associated with us did anything wrong, but rather that we are in possession of distressed properties where the stabilization, recovery,  transfer, sustainability planning and compliance phases are taking much longer and are proving more complex than anyone had hoped.

The underlying issue is that the entire Money Island marina, in fact most of the small rural port community of Money Island, was built almost a century ago without building permits, land surveys, tideland leases, etc. We assumed these properties would be acquired by the state like other local working waterfronts and that would transfer the issue to the state to deal with (as with other marinas like neighboring Fortescue). But in the years since Sandy, little has actually been accomplished. Apparently the state switched from being a cooperative partner in our restoration efforts to being an adversary. We don’t know why but we suspect the action is not in good faith.

The lawsuit comes down to this: the government has declined at least 15 permit or license applications or pre-application inquiries since Sandy (when Novak legally took over management) and is now suing us because those same permits are not issued.  It is, in our opinion, unconscionable for the state to be both the denier of permits and simultaneously bring charges for failure to have permits that should have been addressed decades ago.

Most significant in this matter is the observation that the NJDEP abandoned its normal problem-solving mechanisms (pre-permit planning meetings, application review and comment and alternate dispute resolution) to opt for decline of applications and direct to lawsuit with no attempt at resolution. One NJDEP program director told me that this was the first time in her career that she saw this pattern of action by her department and so she did not know what to advise me.

Here is:

Learning to speak climate at the bayshore

My work involves speaking with a wide range of people about observations in nature. I am clear that this is the largest issue affecting our lives, our community’s future and our society but this ‘heavy stuff’ is of course not the message of day-to-day communications. More likely, I get questions like “Why are the fish coming in later?” or “Why can’t I get a building permit?” These are not simple topics to discuss. Like many others in a similar position, I struggle to find the right words to use to communicate the extent of what I observe on a day-to-day basis here at the bayshore. I’ve had more formal training is science in general, and climate science in particular, than most people. Some call it indoctrination. I call it command of facts. But that’s not necessarily an advantage when it comes to leadership. A leader must engage a wide community group base but how is this possible on the issue of climate?

When I think about local media coverage like last June’s front page article in the Philadelphia Inquirer where I was one of several intelligent, educated and well-informed business owners (I know them all pretty well since this is such a small community) who deal with climate issues on a day-to-day basis at the core of their businesses. The writer chose to give more print and apparently did not make any attempt to fact check the statements of the local mayor who said “There is no sea-level rise, and it’s a bunch of hogwash”. The mayor admits that he has no training in science or climate issues. Yet his statement as given more prominence that the considerable better-informed sources. Why would a major newspaper allow this? Would they have printed the story the same if the mayor said the earth is flat or that the planet was created 5,000 years ago? If not, then what possible basis are we using to justify the public expression of these unchallenged false climate statements? This is just one example. I am also aware of a local book writer whose work in progress seems to give credence to climate deniers.

I know that certain words trigger an angry response, can cause our businesses to lose customers and may even cause us to lose government infrastructure funding. I’ve been physically assaulted and verbally threatened for my talk about climate-related issues. Yet I’ve been clear that climate denial is not a logically or legally defensible position. In fact I would be willing to be a witness for the prosecution in future cases that challenge climate change deniers.

In our local market dominated by trumpist thinking, even mention of the term “climate change” in print sets off angry responses. Other words like “strategic retreat”, “inundation”, “sea level rise”, “fact”, and even “science” itself are controversial.

So how then do I talk about the things I see and the things I can’t explain without an understanding of climate issues? It his latest book Thomas Friedman1 offers some suggestions from his conversations with Greenlanders:

“Just a few years ago,… but then something changed…”

“Wow, I’ve never seen that before…”

“Well, usually, but now I don’t know anymore…”

“We haven’t seen something like that since…”

That’s all climate-speak—“surpassing,” “highest,” “record,” “broken,” “biggest,” “longest.”

The fact is that the impact of climate change, acidification, sea level rise and warming temperatures affect me and my industry more than anything else. It would be nice to be able to talk about it.


1Friedman, Thomas L.. Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations (p. 162). Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

New warning about the impact of climate change

This post is a summary of the June 28, 2016 strongly worded letter to Congress by 31 organizations in the scientific community to emphasize that the severity of climate change impacts is increasing and is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades.

For the United States, climate change impacts include greater threats of extreme weather events, sea level rise, and increased risk of regional water scarcity, heat waves, wildfires, and the disturbance of biological systems. The severity of climate change impacts is increasing and is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades.

Yet 180 members of Congress are believed to be climate deniers” so now these 31 major scientific organisations in the US – including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Meteorological Society and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics – have signed a joint letter to Congress urging them to accept that climate change is real and action needs to be taken.